Contents

The 4 Best Broadheads for Elk – Reviews 2020 Photo by Nick Perla / CC BY It should be noted right off the bat that there are numerous kinds of arrows out on the market that are more than sufficient for bringing down an elk. If you’re already an experienced bowman (or bow woman) who is looking into elk hunting for the first time, then your current system may be adequate. However, if you would like to truly find what is the most deadly and effective type of arrow for bringing down an elk, then you’ve come to the right place.

The 4 Best Broadheads for Elk – Reviews 2020 Photo by Nick Perla / CC BY It should be noted right off the bat that there are numerous kinds of arrows out on the market that are more than sufficient for bringing down an elk. If you’re already an experienced bowman (or bow woman) who is looking into elk hunting for the first time, then your current system may be adequate. However, if you would like to truly find what is the most deadly and effective type of arrow for bringing down an elk, then you’ve come to the right place. Many bow hunters will agree that the arrow best suited for this purpose is the steel broadhead. In this article, we will explore the 4 best broadheads for elk followed by the criteria that your arrows must meet. By the end of this article, you’ll have received all the information you need for selecting the broadhead that will serve you the best on your next elk hunt. G5 Montec Crossbow Broadhead G5 Outdoors Montec Crossbow Broadheads (3-Pack), 100 Grain Price: $37.31 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:25 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. The G5 Montec Broadhead is a type of arrow that has been used by many hunters for many years on all kinds of big game from deer to elk. What attracts many bow hunters to it is its one piece design that dramatically cuts the chances of your equipment failing you while out on the field. Constructed entirely out of carbon steel, the sharp diamond cut of the arrow maximizes penetration into the animal and will crush bone. These are some of the best broadheads for elk on the market. Trophy Taker Shuttle T-Lock Broadhead Trophy Taker 100 gr Shuttle T-LOK Broadheads- Black 3-Pack Price: $27.88 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:25 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. If a smaller broadhead is what you desire (hunters who prefer the ability to fire faster follow up shots do so), then the "Trophy Taker Shuttle" T-Lock Broadhead is definitely worth your attention. Despite being on the lighter side, the T-Lock is still a very rugged arrow. For one thing, it’s made out of a single piece of stainless steel and utilizes a strong lade locking system. The arrow ( see full specs ) is also entirely silent in its flight thanks to the non-vented curves of the blade. The blades are razor sharp, but they are also tipped chisel-style so that they can penetrate deeply and ensure a heavy impact. These should be on anyone’s list of the best broadheads for elk. OTP Trophy Taker T Lock Broadheads.wmv Watch this video on YouTube

The Art of Engraved & Custom Guns

The Art of Engraved & Custom Guns

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d3a6dd47_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d3a6dd47_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } As investors flock to collectible guns as safe havens in these unstable economic times, we take a look at examples of some of the finer engraved and embellished guns. A factory Ruger No. 1 chambered for the 300 H&H cartridge was the raw material provided to Gary Goudy. He fitted the Kepplinger trigger to the rifle and did all the metal polishing. Photo by Gary Bolster Goudy then crafted the stock from a superb stick of English walnut, finished off by one of his trademark exquisite checkering jobs. The pattern he used is reminiscent of patterns used on high-grade Winchester guns in the past. All Photos by Gary Bolster Herman Waldron started with a small ring VZ-33 Mauser action for this rifle. He did all the metalsmithing chores necessary to convert the military action to a wonderful sporting rifle, including stippling the bolt knob. He fitted the barrel and chambered it for the 25-06 cartridge. Fisher/Blackburn rounded bottom metal was used for the rifle as well. Gary Goudy fashioned the lovely custom stock from a nice stick of California English walnut, and executed one of his renowned checkering patterns on it. This rifle is ready for the field. This Remington Model 700 Left Hand rifle came from the shop of the Williams Gun Sight Company. The detail photos show various examples of the work. The factory action was “blueprinted” and the barrel-mounted recoil lug removed. A new recoil lug was pinned and soldered in place. New England Custom Gun sights and EAW scope mounts were installed. The custom Bastogne walnut stock features a Dakota skeleton grip cap and buttplate, and is extensively checkered with a 26 panel pattern with fine ribbons throughout. All metalwork was accomplished by Williams metalsmith Rob Canze, and the stock and checkering executed by Williams stockmaker Kevin Wigton. Photo by Terry Tremewan Gunmaker Hughes was looking for a suitable sidelock barreled action around which to craft a superb duck gun for one of his clients. He found what he was looking for when a Belgian exhibitor at the SCI Convention displayed an in-the-white barreled action. It had been made in Belgium by Britte Armes En Blanc, which ceased making sporting gun parts in 1936. That barreled action had been sitting in the basement of the former company for nearly seventy years! Hughes did much of the metalwork, rust-bluing the gun, and nitre-bluing the screws and small parts. E.L. “Larry” Peters executed the wonderful layout and engraving, Doug Turnbull Restorations did the color case-hardening, and J. Peter “Pete” Mazur charcoal-blacked the furniture and gold-plated the lock parts. Photo by Steven Dodd Hughes A lightweight 270 Improved from the shop of Lee Helgeland, weighing in at six pounds, twelve ounces, with scope and mounts. It features a G3?0 Mauser action and a 26-inch Krieger barrel. The stock was crafted from a stick of tiger-tail California English walnut. Jerome Glimm did the screw head engraving, George Komadina did the rust blue, and Larry Baer did the color case on the trigger guard, rings and bases. Lee did everything else, in-house. Photos by "Steven Dodd Hughes" Close-up view of an absolutely magnificent Winchester 73 that Bob Swartley engraved “after the art of Albert Bierstadt.” Swartley's scrollwork is so distinctive that it can be recognized from a distance by anyone even slightly knowledgeable of his work. His bulino work is delicate and utterly exquisite. Jim Blair is another relatively young engraver whose work is so good it is mind-boggling. His work on this 22 is superlative. I can't imagine a more attractive job than this example of his artistry. A right side and left-side view of a lovely rifle which exhibits a little of the California influence on maker Ray Riganian. The diamond-shaped ivory inlays are somewhat reminiscent of the Roy Weatherby rifle. Ray started with a Winchester Model 70 Classic action, and he applied all the bells and whistles to it. Surface grinding, truing all surfaces concentric with the bore, fitting Blackburn bottom metal, making custom bases for modified Talley rings, building up and checkering the bolt release, and thinning the trigger to a shotgun-type trigger, are just some of the refinements to the action. He fitted a Krieger barrel and chambered it for the 7mm Weatherby Magnum cartridge. He then crafted the stock from a very nice stick of California English walnut, and pillar-bedded the barreled action into the wood. This rifle is a tack-driver, according to Riganian. Photo courtesy of Ray Riganian The Springfield action 400 Whelen rifle from the shop of N.L. Heineke is shown here without the case and accessories. Styled after the pre-war Griffin & Howe sporters so favored by Col. Whelen, it is a superb rifle. The rifle is chambered for the 400 Whelen cartridge, and is fitted with two scopes, a Burris 4? scope and a Lyman Alaskan 2.5? scope, but mounted in G&H side mounts. A magnificent Terry Tussey custom .45 auto fabricated from a Caspian Arms frame and slide. When finished, master engraver Eric Gold, who also carved the superb ivory grips, marvelously engraved the gun. This gun is a superb example of the engraver's art. This cased flintlock pistol is the work of Jerry Huddleston. Jerry made every item and every piece in this set, including the case, with the exception of the commercially acquired lock. Even there, he completely redid the lock to meet his requirements. He even cast all the silver accoutrements, and made the barrel. He also did all the engraving and inlay work. A nice side view of a lovely Colt Single Action Army revolver. The revolver is a 5-inch barrel 357 Magnum 3rd Generation Colt. Ron engraved the gun in what Colt calls tight American scroll, ? coverage or “C” coverage. The gold inlay work is in the fashion of Leonard Francolini. Dan Chesnak did the ivory grips, and the case colors and bluing are by Dewey Vicknair. Two images of a glorious rifle put together by a team of superb craftsmen. The action is a “baby” Farquharson that was made by Clayton Nelson, probably twenty or so years ago. Fine rifle connoisseur Jack Lilliendahl somehow ended up with the action and another superb project was begun. Steve Heilmann did the metalwork on the rifle, and barreled and chambered it for the 17 HMR cartridge. Stockmaker James Tucker crafted the extraordinary stock from an exceptional stick of walnut. Sam Welch executed the engraving in a theme suitable to the caliber of the rifle, and dubbed the rifle the “Rabbit rifle,” or sometimes “Thumper.” The finishing chores were turned over to Pete Mazur, a master of the alchemy of metal finishing. 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Ready out of the box: The FNS9c for concealed carry

Ready out of the box: The FNS9c for concealed carry

I’ve always liked FN firearms. My family and I bought my Father-In-Law an FNP years ago. However, it wasn’t until they came out with the FNS line that their firearms became concealed carry contenders for me personally. I have a preference toward simplicity and operational familiarity when it comes to my carry weapons. All the DA/SA handguns previously produced by FN were cool to me and great fun at the range but always a good option for someone else when it came to real world tasks. Then amidst the industry noise of all the new single stack polymer concealed carry handguns flooding the market, FN quietly released the FNS line. The FNS is a Glock 19ish-sized weapon with a bit longer grip, a duty gun, with 17 round capacity. If you took a close look back then, you noticed that many of the distinguishing features on the stock FNS handguns mirror the custom market(s) for Glock and M&P pistols. In particular, think about these features as they relate to the FN9c as a candidate for concealed carry. Consider the parallels. Slide: The FNS slide is contorted to have a slimmer profile toward the top and has been outfitted with generously aggressive rear and forward cocking serrations. These modifications are often milled into stock Glocks, M&Ps, and other polymer wonder guns. Observe: Stock Glock Slide Custom Glock Slide courtesy of Innovative Gunfighter Solutions Stock FNS9c Slide Trigger: The FNS triggers, t hough duty weight, have less take up and over travel than most polymer pistols and feature a super positive reset. In my opinion, the trigger that comes stock on the FNS has similar function to some of the Glock & M&P aftermarket products. There is no question that one can get a much better trigger (if willing to spend the extra coin) in the generously flooded aftermarket, but the FNS triggers are above average for stock triggers and perhaps equal to some of the less expensive aftermarket options. Aftermarket Glock Trigger Photo courtesy of Ghost Inc Stock FNS trigger Grip: The FNS factory grip texture is stipple-like and aggressive. I would personally prefer that the pinky extension grip of the FNS9c be less pronounced. It offers more real estate than most hands need to get their pinky finger on board. Also, the extension doesn’t add capacity, so I think it’s a net loss as it comes from the factory. However, the gun comes with three factory magazine options, and one or two are sure to please. If you’re handy with a Dremel tool it’s pretty easy to shorten the pinky grip so that it doesn’t print when concealed under a garment but still provides adequate purchase while shooting. The backstraps are interchangeable, and, though nothing to write home about, they are suitably effective. The ribbing on the front of the grip is surprisingly positive. Also, there is texture on the front of the trigger guard if you’re into that kind of thing. Custom Glock Grip Stock FNS Grips Modified Magazine Sights: The FNS sights are metal and the front post has a great big ol’ white dot. Again, this is an often upgraded feature on other polymer guns. Glock with XS Big Dot sights FNS stock sights In summary, the FNS9c and its family members are just all around good guns. In my experience, it’s as accurate as it needs to be and reliable. I mean really reliable. After the FNS came out, FN proceeded to release an FNSc line and an FNSL line. I’ve owned all three, and they are really enjoyable guns. Here’s my take on FNS as of the summer of 2016. If you want to buy a gun and be done, change the sights perhaps but nothing else, these guns are money in the bank. Go get one right now. If you want to make changes and need aftermarket do-dads, this line may not be your best bet. In particular, the trigger system is good but complex. It may be a minute before custom trigger manufacturers release a trigger set for these fine handguns. I’ve heard rumors that Apex is working on something but don’t know if it’s any more than gun shop talk or not. Also, the FNS9c’s magazine release is lower profile than I would prefer but focused training can resolve this. If I where an aftermarket do-dad maker, I’d release an FNS9c mag release that’s more FNS sized. FN, if you’re listening, hint hint . Regardless, I’d say the FNS line offers potentially the best value on the striker fired/double stack market to date. The FNS9c in particular is a mighty fine carry piece that should be considered by most (if not all) that are shopping in the double stack/polymer/striker fired category. Give the FNS line a second look, you’ll be glad you did.

The Colt New Agent: All Business For Concealed Carry

The Colt New Agent: All Business For Concealed Carry

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cc456b1f_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cc456b1f_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Colt New Agent at SHOT Show 2012. The Colt New Agent — with its subtle, all-business trench-style sights — stood out from the crowd at SHOT Show 2012 and might be the ideal backup gun for concealed carry. After several days of wandering about the SHOT Show, one begins to get the “2,000-yard stare.” People afflicted by this sorry condition cast a hollow gaze out upon the show floor. Usually the stupor is harmless enough, but occasionally the more serious cases require the patient to be carted off in a white straight jacket. Just about anything can trigger it, but the most common culprit is processing too much data on guns sporting everything but the kitchen sink. And I believe some next year will very likely feature kitchen sinks. The Colt New Agent Model 07810D, with traditional-style finish and grips. It was amidst this backdrop that the Colt New Agent — with its subtle, all-business trench-style sights — stood out from the crowd and jolted me back to reality. This is a seemingly quaint little handgun that isn't trying to please everybody or fit into a multitude of shooting disciplines: It's got one identity and that's as a so-close-and-there's-no-time-I-must-shoot-right-now gun. In other words, this gun is all business. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! While I'm sure the trench-style sights (essentially a full-length groove running along the top of the slide) will get the job done under 7 yards, the model I saw (07812DCT), in all black, was outfitted with a Crimson Trace laser grip. I have to admit that I was surprisingly attracted to the looks of this pistol. And its lack of obtrusive sights on top is obviously conducive to a snag-free draw from deep concealment. Related GunDigest Articles Concealed Carry Holsters: 7 New Carry Rigs Gallery: 10 Great Concealed Carry Handguns 4 Must-Have Concealed Carry Upgrades Actually, according to the Standard Catalog of Firearms , the Colt New Agent was first introduced in 2007. That source lists it as having “fixed” sights and a series 80 action. Of course, the New Agent's namesake is derived from the Colt Agent — its revolver counterpart from the '50s era. The Standard Catalog of Colt lists the Colt Agent revolver as being introduced in 1955 and produced through 1973 as the Colt Agent 1st Issue. A slightly more streamlined version, the Colt Agent 2nd Issue, was manufactured from 1973 to 1986. Both sixguns were essentially identical to 1st Issue Colt Cobra six-shooters, but with shortened grip frames for easier concealment. The Colt New Agent carries this torch only in a semi-automatic format. Now, if you're like me and find the all black finish and laser treatment of the 07812DCT Model not quite to your stylistic liking, you might check out the Model 07810D Colt New Agent. It has a more traditional style grip and finish. Both pistols feature an enhanced hammer, 1918 style safety lock, standard grip safety and 3-hole aluminum trigger. A lowered and flared ejection port is common to both, and Colt claims this feature enhances reliability and accuracy.

Survival Gear Review: Gum Creek Vehicle Handgun Mount

Many preppers will be seriously considering an evacuation to a secondary home, Bug Out Location, or other hideout in the event of a SHTF scenario .  One assumes then some kind of transportation vehicle along with weapons has to be in the mix. Quick Navigation WITHIN REACH HANDGUN VEHICLE CARRY GUM CREEK’S VEHICLE HANDGUN MOUNT READY TO PULL DUTY GUM CREEK INSTALLATION VIDEO WHERE TO BUY? WITHIN REACH HANDGUN VEHICLE CARRY One of the concerns then will be personal and passenger security in transit.  Of course, this is getting to be a serious situation in everyday life in many parts of the country.  It is prudent to learn which areas of the city or area where you reside to stay out of day or night.  For protection do you plan to use the accelerator or are you planning any type of armed response if the threat becomes serious enough? In such cases how will you carry a firearm in your Ultimate Survival Vehicle that you can not only reach quickly and easily, but that would also remain out of sight for the most part, though not illegally concealed as far as most areas of the country are concerned?  A gun sitting on the car seat has its own issues.  In the driver side door sleeve places the gun on the left side, while most are right handed.  In the center console or glove compartment takes crucial time to deploy.  Are there other options? GUM CREEK’S VEHICLE HANDGUN MOUNT From time to time a new product comes on the market that not only brings a smile to the face but a bit of jealousy that we didn’t think of it. The Gum Creek Handgun Mount is so simple you wanna slap yourself. The basic mount is a metal frame and heavy nylon strapping that secures two hooks on the underside of the steering column of a vehicle.  The top hook slips under the column between it and the plastic trim below it.  The bottom hook then slips over the lower edge of the same trim piece.  An adjustable strap buckle is pulled tight to secure the mount.  Onto the mount is secured a standard handgun holster that fits the weapon you use.  It is secured to the mount via two Velcro ® straps that wrap around the mount. Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA If for some reason the upper hook does not fit in the space between the steering column and the lower trim, Gum Creek also makes a rather universal adaptor strap that goes around the steering column and buckle locks on top.  On the bottom of the adaptor strap is a metal slot for the upper hook to fit into. I mounted this rig on my Chevrolet Silverado pick up truck.  I had to use the adaptor strap because of the space and angle of the top part of the trim piece would not work right.  The adaptor is primo.  Install then pull on the buckle straps to tighten everything up. I used the factory holster that Gum Creek sells for the standard 1911 Colt or clone.  It straps in just fine, but any holster with a belt loop or clip can be used.  The mount requires no tools to install and it took less than five minutes once I figured out I needed to use the adaptor.  It works for small to large handguns and is quick to release as well. READY TO PULL DUTY I slipped into the seat and drove the truck.  The mount did not interfere with steering at all.  The holster is oriented with the gun’s grip positioned so that a right handed driver can easily retrieve it out of its secure clutch.  I retained the handgun holster thumb release strap for extra security, but I think the system would hold a handgun tight enough as is. Gum Creek supplies an excellent installation manual complete with nine photos to illustrate the whole process of installing the mount.  The directions are clear and concise. GUM CREEK INSTALLATION VIDEO Can the mount with handgun be seen from outside the vehicle?  Hard to say, and frankly it doesn’t really matter unless a break in theft is an issue.  Someone walking up to the vehicle might see it, but with a driver seated, I doubt it. The Gum Creek Vehicle Handgun Mount is an excellent product.  The mount-holster combo retails for $49.95.  The mount can be bought alone for $34.95.  Check out their web site at www.gumcreekcustoms.com . WHERE TO BUY? Brownell’s – Universal Vehicle Holster Mount & Adapter Photos by: SurvivalCache.com Team Gum Creek Customs Other interesting articles: Holsters For Bug Out Carry Survival Gear Review: G-Code Modular Holsters "Survival Gear Review" : Skinner “HTF” Tactical Garment Bag Survival Gear Review: Craft Holsters

BlackBore Shotgun Chokes Shooting for Tighter Patterns

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d504771d_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d504771d_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } BlackBore recently introduced a tactical version of its cutting-edge, wad-retarding shotgun choke. With specially designed porting, BlackBore Shotgun chokes strips the wad and develops tighter patterns. The argument goes, in some shotgun circles, the wad interferes with tight shot patterns. According to this theory, the wad strikes the rear of the shot column as it leaves the barrel. This, in turn, leads to a looser pattern and more fliers than many wing and clay shooters are comfortable firing off. This was Mark Andry’s experience when the sporting-clays bug bit him a few year's back. And he didn’t waste anytime setting about finding a solution. Related GunDigest Articles Getting the Swing of a Proper Shotgun Swing How to Find a Shooting Range Video: Action Rifle Shooting with Jerry Miculek “Having a mechanical ‘bent', I felt that I could come up with a better (choke) design,” he said. The result of Andry’s “better design” was BlackBore Chokes . The system aims to take the wad out of the equation by the use of a common choke feature – ports. BlackBore Competition model. Of course, there is a little more to the 10 to 14 ports Andry has milled on the circumference of his chokes – hence the reason they are patented. The twist the inventor/owner of BlackBore puts in the ventilation is the angle at which they are cut. “(The angle) produces a knife-blade that grabs and strips the shotshell wad from the shot column,” Andry said. “The friction of the blades actually slices slivers from the wad as it passes through the choke.”

Summary

The 4 Best Broadheads for Elk – Reviews 2020 Photo by Nick Perla / CC BY It should be noted right off the bat that there are numerous kinds of arrows out on the market that are more than sufficient for bringing down an elk. If you’re already an experienced bowman (or bow woman) who is looking into elk hunting for the first time, then your current system may be adequate. However, if you would like to truly find what is the most deadly and effective type of arrow for bringing down an elk, then you’ve come to the right place.